Women don't have the confidence to be the boss: ABS report

February 28, 2013, 10:24 amYahoo!7

The Australian Social Trends report from ABS says there are many barriers to success for women in workplace but puts it down to one major roadblock.


Women in Australia have more employment opportunities and are more educated than ever before, however gender equality at senior levels in the workplace has yet to be achieved, a new report says.

The Australian Social Trends report from ABS says there are many barriers to success for women in workplace but puts it down to one major roadblock – some women just don't have the confidence to become boss.

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''Some women are seen to have a lack of confidence in their abilities and are less likely to put their hands up for promotion. Whereas men are willing to put their hand up for a role where they may not tick some or all of the boxes, some women may only apply for the job if they feel confident they are a good fit for the job,” the report says.

The report also says workplace “glass ceiling” is also a major barrier. “The glass ceiling is a term that is often applied to women being unable to progress from middle to senior management. One reason for this may be due to unconscious bias towards leaders of a certain age, gender and race,” it says.

In the same vein, the report also suggests that female politicians are drawn to the Senate because they are not as ambitious as the lower house parliamentarians who form the government or aim to become prime ministers.

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“This may be due to people regarding upper house seats in the Senate as less desirable than seats in the House of Representatives, particularly ambitious people who aim their careers towards working in the House of Representatives where government is formed,” the ABS report says.

The ABS report also shows that working mothers still spend twice the time as working dads in looking after the kids when they get home.

“A woman in full-time work spends an average of six hours and 39 minutes each day taking care of kids - compared to three hours and 43 minutes a day for a man,” says the report.

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